Where to Eat

Rome is filled with restaurants, and the ones nearest popular attractions typically offer menus in English as well as Italian. Those restaurants are more touristy (and likely more expensive) than the ones you'll find down side streets, but they do generally offer a good taste of the local cuisines.

The price code for the restaurant entrees below is $ = 100 or more.

Dune Restaurant

$

The Dune is within easy walking distance of Trevi fountain and offers local dishes as well as international cuisine. You can get small or large dishes here, including soups, salads, and omelets. The homemade pasta menu will make you feel deliciously carb guilty just for looking at it.

www.dunerestaurant.it.

Antico Arco

$$-$$$$

There's a wine bar plus four dining rooms at this out-of-the-way, upscale restaurant that consistently wins rave reviews from clients who appreciate how the menu changes with each season. Traditional Roman dishes are the essence of what's offered, but foodies looking for interesting twists on the local cuisine will not be disappointed.

www.anticoarco.it.

La Terraza dell'Eden

$$$$

If you want to spend some serious euro for one night's farewell dinner in Rome, La Terrazza dell'Eden is a good choice. It's the elegant rooftop restaurant of Hotel Eden, serving high-end Mediterranean cuisine with spectacular city views and soft piano music. There's a lovely bar here, too, if you want to enjoy a nice chianti before dinner.

www.starwoodhotels.com.

Agata e Romeo

$$-$$$

Back in the late 1800s, the Agata family used to serve roasted pig. Today, the restaurant boasts fine chefs of both Italian and French culinary schools, as well as a thriving catering business in the private homes of Roman nobles. The wine list is extensive and worldly, and has been featured in Wine Spectator magazine. This restaurant also has received noteworthy ink from Travel + Leisure, the Los Angeles Times, and Marie Claire, to name a few.

www.agataeromao.it.

Ad Hoc

$-$$

One of the great things about this restaurant, in the heart of Rome, is that it offers a private room for no more than five people — a wonderful way to experience authentic Italian cuisine if you are on your honeymoon or traveling with close friends or family. The owners claim that everything is made fresh, with no frozen ingredients, and the pasta is cooked with olive oil instead of butter or cream, so you can feel free to indulge without the guilt.

www.ristoranteadhoc.com.

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