Orgasms in Women

Fortunately for women, they are able to benefit from a much greater variety of orgasms than men.

Vaginal Orgasm

Some women claim not to have vaginal orgasms, and it is very possible they are telling the truth. Indeed, this type of orgasm can be tricky to achieve. For one thing, the vagina is not exactly optimally designed for maximum orgasmic potential — most of the sensations are felt in the first (outer) third of the vagina. (However, experts and researchers such as Barbara Keesling have discussed the pleasure potential of the “cul-de-sac” — an area at the back of the vaginal canal, just behind where the cervix enters the vagina. Women can experience very intense orgasms with stimulation here. Some refer to this as “the X-spot.”). In actuality, when most people talk about a vaginal orgasm, they are more specifically referring to a G-Spot orgasm.

In her well-known book The Art of Sexual Ecstasy, Margo Anand describes over a dozen different types of orgasms, including: the penile and prostatic orgasms in men, the anal orgasm in both sexes, and local orgasms of the breast, throat, and lower spine. She also differentiates between the explosive orgasm of outward release and the implosive orgasm of inward expansion.

G-Spot Orgasm

For something so small, the G-spot has certainly managed to get lots of attention — and stir up more than its share of controversy. Some people don't believe it exists at all, while others swear by its ability to produce unparalleled pleasure.

The G-Spot is a small area within the upper wall of the vagina, about one to two inches from the opening. Some women have the ability to reach orgasm through direct stimulation of the G-Spot or gentle massage of the area. When the G-Spot is stimulated, the woman will often feel as if she has the urge to urinate. And, in fact, during a G-Spot orgasm, many women will mistakenly believe they have accidentally urinated. This is because a G-Spot orgasm is notable because it is usually accompanied by a lot of fluid. This is generally referred to as “female ejaculation.”

Figure 4-1 Location of the G-Spot

Men, do not despair if you have trouble finding your partner's G-spot. Many women cannot even find their own G-spot easily, so it is not surprising that it would be a challenge for a man to locate this elusive yet magical place.

Clitoral Orgasm

The clitoral orgasm is generally viewed as the easiest type of orgasm for a woman to achieve. Some women also deem it the most pleasurable, but other women who experience G-spot orgasm, X-spot, or whole-body orgasm may disagree with that. In fact, many women are unable to achieve orgasm unless the clitoris is stimulated, even if this occurs only indirectly by way of friction from intercourse. However, this is often because, with most sexual encounters, women don't get enough time to awaken their vaginas and the sensitive spots internally to experience orgasm through stimulation of them. If lovemaking was extended long enough to really, really arouse a woman before penetration, it is a safe bet that lots more women would be experiencing more than clitoral orgasm.

This is reflected by women's habits when it comes to self-pleasure. When masturbating, the majority of women focus on clitoral stimulation and bring themselves to orgasm solely in this way, since they have learned that this is often the quickest and most efficient route to orgasm.

The word clitoris is based on a Greek word meaning “little hill.” Most people don't realize that the clitoris is much bigger than it seems — it actually extends up into the body for several inches. The clitoris is also the only genital organ designed purely for pleasure — meaning, it serves no role in the reproductive process at all.

Are Female Orgasms “Necessary”?

Throughout history, the orgasms of men were viewed with more respect because they were considered to have a functional and vital purpose — the transfer of sperm in order to procreate. By contrast, female orgasms were seen as a “luxury,” an indulgence purely for pleasure. It was believed that they served no biological purpose and therefore were largely considered unnecessary. Not everyone shared that view, though. In the fourth century B.C., Hippocrates stated his belief that in order for a woman to become pregnant, she must achieve orgasm. However, his peer Aristotle disputed this, and as a result female pleasure continued to be dismissed as unimportant.

But recently this debate has come to life again, as researchers and other notable figures are again arguing about whether the female orgasm serves any functional and essential purpose. Some experts believe female orgasm helps create a “suction” effect that aids the sperm in reaching the uterus, thus making pregnancy more likely.

In his 1953 book Sexual Behavior in the Human Female, Dr. Alfred A. Kinsey found that 39 to 47 percent of women reported that they always, or almost always, had orgasm during intercourse.

But others are unconvinced that the female orgasm is necessary, biologically speaking. In a book called The Case of the Female Orgasm: Bias in the Science of Evolution, published in 2005, Dr. Elisabeth A. Lloyd, a professor of biology at Indiana University, examines twenty leading theories about the evolutionary purpose of female orgasm. She finds flaws with all of them, and in the end reaches the conclusion that female orgasms serve no evolutionary function at all.

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