Kegel Exercises

One important type of routine you can do to improve your sex life is called Kegel exercises. PC (pubococcygeal) muscle exercises (also known as Kegel exercises) help strengthen the muscles in your pelvic region. Kegel exercises are known by many different names. In addition to the term PC exercises, these moves are sometimes also called pelvic floor exercisers, pelvic toners, or PC trainers. These exercises stimulate blood flow to the pelvic area and give you greater control over all of the individual muscles in that region. This is a good thing for many reasons, but the most obvious benefit is that it helps women maintain a tighter grip on the penis during sex. Their partners are often amazed at the woman's renewed “tightness” — sometimes saying it feels like having sex with a virgin.

Many people mistakenly believe Kegels are only for women. On the contrary, men can benefit from practicing these exercises as well. Strengthening these muscles can help men maintain stronger, longer-lasting erections. And for women, the benefits include heightened sensation during sex, more powerful orgasms, and better overall pelvic conditioning and control. On a less exciting but just as important note, strengthening your pelvic floor and the associated muscles can also help prevent problems such as urinary incontinence, uterine prolapse, and bladder problems. All in all, it is a win-win situation.

Kegel exercises were introduced to Western medicine by a gynecologist and obstetrician named Dr. Arnold Kegel in the 1940s. He originally recommended them to help older woman fight incontinence, and also to help women regain vaginal strength and tightness after childbirth. But it didn't take long for women to realize that these exercises could also greatly improve their sex lives.

These exercises are simple to do — and can be done almost anywhere, at any time. (However, in the beginning, it's usually best to do them in the privacy of your home while sitting on the bed or floor. You might also try putting a pillow or rolled-up towel underneath you, as some people find that the slight pressure on their pelvic floor makes it easier for them to get accustomed to doing these exercises.) You just contract your pelvic muscles, as if you were trying to stop a flow of urine. Hold this contraction for a second, then release. Be sure to let your muscles relax fully between each repetition. Some people like to do 100 or more Kegels a day.

It is important to coordinate your breathing when doing Kegel exercises. Inhale while contracting, hold your breath while clenching, and then exhale when releasing. Most likely, you will find that your breathing falls into line naturally as you do these routines.

Advanced Kegels

Once you have mastered the basic Kegel, you can take things to the next level and step it up to something a bit more challenging. Try holding the “contracted” position longer — maybe while inhaling and exhaling without releasing the hold. Or try to relax your muscles very slowly and gradually, rather than in one swift movement. You should also vary between fast, intense Kegels and slow, more sustained moves. This will target different muscles in that area and ensure that you strengthen the entire muscle group.

Isolate the Individual Muscles

After you have been doing this for a while and have mastered the basic Kegel, you will probably have a whole new outlook on the muscles in your pelvic region. At first, you probably thought there was just one big muscle that controlled the whole operation down there. If that were the case, doing the Kegel exercises regularly was probably a valuable learning experience for you. By this point, you should have realized that the pelvic region involves not just one muscle, but several different groups of muscles, each of which work independently and perform different functions.

As you strengthen your pelvic floor and become adept at doing Kegels, you will also learn how to isolate each individual group of pelvic muscles. By isolating each individual muscle or group of muscles, you can reap the maximum rewards from these exercises. Not only will you be able to strengthen these muscles more efficiently, but you will learn how to identify and control each muscle individually. As a result, you will be able to contract and flex these muscles in ways you never could before — making for some exciting new sensations during sexual encounters. Most likely, these moves will not go unnoticed by your partner, who will also reap the rewards of your newfound mastery of the PC muscles. This is especially true in the case of men, who often enjoy displaying their pelvic mastery by demonstrating their ability to control the movement of their penis in new and improved ways.

Women can maximize the benefits of these exercises by purchasing a Kegel egg (also called a vaginal strengthening egg). The Kegelmaster is another “toy” that is helpful for this purpose. Or, just about any sex toy will do. Simply tense your PC muscles as you try to remove it, doing your best to resist the pulling action and trying to hold the toy in.

The Elevator

A common type of advanced Kegel routine is known as “the Elevator.” You will only be able to attempt this after you have totally mastered the basic Kegel. You will contract your pelvic muscles slowly. Imagine they are an elevator. When the elevator is on the first floor, you are in a relaxed state. Then slowly start trying to pull the elevator up to the first floor by contracting the first set of muscles. Move on to the second floor, the third, and so on. When you reach the top floor and have contracted all of your pelvic muscles, hold that state for a moment. Then slowly release, bringing the elevator back down, one floor at a time.

Pulsing

Another advanced variation of the Kegel is called pulsing or fluttering. This is where you quickly tighten and release the PC muscle in a pulsating rhythm over several seconds. For a real challenge, try doing a pulsating move while you are on the “top floor” of your elevator technique.

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