How to Use Essential Oils

The application of oils is simple. The most common way is with a diffuser. Diffusers allow particles of oil to be scattered through the air and inhaled. With the use of essential oils, less is more. Two or three drops in a bowl of hot water or a cold water spray is usually enough to disperse the scent throughout a large room.

The aromatic and healing properties of the oil will work for hours. Bathing is another way to feel the effects of the different oils and wear your favorite scent all day long. Remember to always dilute your oils.

Alert

Essential oils are medicinal and you must follow certain guidelines. Do not use oils undiluted, and do not use them on anyone with cancer, a high temperature, a skin infection, or a childhood disease. If you are pregnant, consult a professional aromatherapist. Use only natural oils, not synthetic ones.

Using Oil for Massage

Oils are used in massage after they have been diluted with a pure carrier oil—jojoba oil is a good choice. The quickest way to feel the effects of essential oils is through the feet. The reflexology points in the ears are also a good place to apply oil.

To decide which oil you like best, give it a sniff test. Open the bottle, let the oil sit, and allow the fragrance to permeate the air. Close your eyes and inhale; see if you experience anything. While inhaling the scent, make sure you …

  • Like the smell.

  • Do not feel sick.

  • Can breathe comfortably.

  • Feel good all over.

  • Do not get a headache.

Also make sure that no one else in the room experiences any negative effects from the oil, especially your massage partner. Once you have had a successful test of the oil you have picked, you can begin.

An Easy Foot Massage

Massaging the feet is a fun and easy way to experiment with the use of aromatics, because feet are one of the best diffusers of oil, spreading the healing properties through the entire body. Let your receiver rest comfortably face up in a lounge chair, on a blanket, or on a table. Carefully place bolsters or pillows under the receiver's knees and behind the head if needed. Cover the receiver with a light blanket because temperature of the body drops when we relax. Take off the receiver's socks and wash the feet.

Fact

The olfactory cells in the nose are replaced every 30 days. Tiny hairs called cilia respond to the different odors in the air and stimulate these cells. Olfactory cells trigger old memories because they connect directly with the section of the brain that relates to feelings, wants, and creativity.

Rub some oil between your hands to warm it up, and apply some to the right foot first with smooth strong strokes. Then apply some to the left foot with the same strokes, and cover the left foot with a towel. Back on the right foot, glide from the toes to the ankle and from the heel to the toes, using both hands at the same time if you wish. If working top and bottom together is too awkward, just work on the top of the foot first and then the bottom.

For this next movement, use your thumbs first on the top of the foot and then on the bottom of the foot. Walk from side to side across the top of the foot using your thumb, covering the entire surface while your fingers hold the bottom of the foot. Switch hands and walk your thumbs across the sole of the foot, covering the entire surface. Now squeeze and press with one of your palms along the sole of the foot and up one side. Switch hands and work on the other side of the same foot.

Next, make your hand into a fist and press gently into the sole of the foot from the heel to the neck of the toes and back again. Grasp the foot with both hands and gently shake, letting the energy run up the leg. Release the foot and, using both hands, gently feather off the top of the foot with your fingertips. Cover the right foot with the towel and work the whole routine on the left foot. When you have completed both feet cover them and rest your hands on top of them.

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