Numbers

Numbers are adjectives, and in Latin there are only four common ones that can be declined.

Unus, -a, -um (one) follows the pattern of special adjectives. There are no plural forms.

Duo, duae, duo (two) is an odd duck. It and only one other word, ambī,ambae, ambī(“both”), have kept the dual number forms.

Table 13-12 Declension of duō,duae, duō

Trē s, tria (three) is a third declension adjective.

lle (thousand) is a problem. In the singular, it is an indeclinable adjective. In the plural, however, it is a third declension i-stem neuter noun: lia, mī lium, mī libus, mī lia, mī libus.

Neither the Greeks nor the Romans used the zero either as a number or as a placeholder. For the Romans, tomorrow was two days from now. (Today is a day, so is tomorrow. That makes two.) Zero and the other Arabic numerals came to the West from India via the Arabs in the tenth century.

September got its name (as did October, November, and December) when March was the first month of the year. March is when we have the vernal equinox, so it's the beginning of spring. Makes sense, don't you think?

Table 13-13 Vocabulary

ū nus, -a, -um

one

duo, duae, duo

two

trē s, tria

three

quattuor

four

quī nque

five

sex

six

septem

seven

octō

eight

novem

nine

decem

ten

centum

hundred

lle

thousand

prī mus, -a, -um

first

secundus, -a, -um

second

tertius, -a, -um

third

quā rtus, -a, -um

fourth

quī ntus, -a, -um

fifth

sextus, -a, -um

sixth

septimus, -a, -um

seventh

octā vus, -a, -um

eighth

nus, -a, -um

ninth

decimus, -a, -um

tenth

centē simus, -a, -um

hundredth

llē simus, -a, -um

thousandth

Latin-to-English Translations

Translate these Latin sentences into English.

  • Accidit ut istud bellum effugere nōn possē mus.

  • , quī anteā oppidōs suōs numquam relī quē rant, trans mare transiē runt.

  • Mors Augustī , quī Romae imperā tor prī mus erat, magna tristitiae causa erat.

  • s tempestā tis tanta erat ut milia nā vium frumentī , vinī , et servō rum plē rum dē vit.

  • Ego mihi mortem servitū dine mā .

  • x illam, cuius filius eum servā vit, in matrimonium ducet.

  • Filia quī nta eius multō pulchrior quam cē terae est.

  • Domus, quae contrā sa est, stā re nōn potest.

  • diē hominēs centum in mediō oppidō contulē runt.

  • Septimā diē post casum Pompē s, petere coepimus ullōs quī superfuerant.

English-to-Latin Translations

Translate these English sentences into Latin.

  • Labiēnus was so skilled in (with respect to) the art of war that Caesar retained him. (perī tus, “skilled”)

  • The senate gave great honors to you alone.

  • Those brave (men whom we were just talking about) climbed this mountain in four days.

  • We brought the bodies of the men who had fallen back to the camp.

  • There were few who survived.

  1. Home
  2. Learning Latin
  3. Pronouns
  4. Numbers
Visit other About.com sites: