The Parent's Role in Learning

Education begins in the home. The more you as a parent take an active role and offer positive support in your child's learning, the greater the possibility that the child will reach her potential in life.

Parents of gifted and talented children seek out private teachers, private schools, or advanced classes to challenge and inspire their children to higher levels of learning or artistic or athletic achievements. The parents of educationally challenged students or “slow learners” often see more in their children than the education system does. They become advocates for their children, seeking out all available help from the education system and elsewhere.

The more you focus on what is right with your child's learning, the more confidence the child will have to take risks and learn more. When you realize that each one of your children is unique, having been born with something special that may help someone in the world, the process of helping your child learn becomes like providing water and nutrients to a flower. Imagine what it would be like if a flower were never nourished and watered.

If you as a parent are willing to take the time to find out how each of your children learns, and if you address some of the questions asked in this chapter or by other types of assessments, you can help your child achieve her highest potential. You may also become the student, and learn more about yourself through your children.

The positive learning experience can start in early childhood, when you are your child's teacher. The more love and encouragement you show the child from the moment of birth, the more confidence the child will have in learning as she grows. A young child can absorb and carry negative feelings throughout her life. If you have not read the chapter on phobias, you may want to refer to hypnotic regressions discussed there for help in ridding your home of negative feelings.

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